Sas Christian
Sas Christian

SAS CHRISTIAN

Christian was born in London in 1968. Although her mother had plans for her to have a career in medicine she had other ideas, and with the support of her headmistress and art teacher at her boarding school, Christian managed to persuade her parents to let her study graphic design. In 1992, Christian and her husband moved to south Florida. They started their own couture latex company called Hotbox Inc. They specialized in custom made fetish rubber clothing. They manufactured their own sheet rubber, which at the time was unheard of. Without any money to push the business forward it was a hard task and eventually they had to call it quits. Christian then worked in a department store, at a commercial art studio and a PIP printing (where she quit on her first day, before lunch). It was around this time that she first saw an issue of Juxtapoz with a cover by Mark Ryden and was struck. The urge to paint was growing, but she lacked the knowledge and confidence to do anything about it. “Jam Sandwich” was the first layered painting she produced, and is the only one of her pieces that she has kept.

Her original inspirations rely heavily on anime, Tamara De Lempicka and Mark Ryden. She loved the creative expression of the Harajuku kids in Tokyo. They filled her with such hope and excitement. Originally the intention of her paintings was just about creating a strong image, purely visual. She wanted to impart a modern tongue-in-cheek humor, incorporating her experiences. Contemporary, ballsy, flirty, weepy girls; punk, catholic, no-nonsense, damaged but not broken girls. Funny, intelligent, unusual, independent, odd ball, outsiders. Lovely.

The next logical step for her was to move into oils. With no formal fine art training whatsoever, and no knowledge of art history and even less of art technique it seemed like the most complicated thing in the world. So, in 2003 she bought a book off the Internet “How to Paint with Oils.” she decided to give it a go, and has never looked back. Oils have a whole new set of rules.

As time goes on she finds herself relying less on the narrative and more on the emotive. She hopes that her work can connect with people on different levels. She is trying to harness a single moment in time, an emotional response, seemingly insignificant gesture that can mean so much.

Fracture, 2016, Oil on Panel, 16 x 12 in.
Fracture, 2016, Oil on Panel, 16 x 12 in.

Blast Off

2016, Giclee on Canvas, 10 x 10 in., Edition of 25

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